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HCLE Spring 2017 Progress Report

Welcome to the spring quarter of 2017 HCLE progress report. We share many of these news items via our outlets (wiki, blog, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn – and now, reddit, too) and collect them here for your and our convenience.

Our staff of 1.4 FTEs, volunteers and outside collaborators reached the following milestones in the winter (April through June) of 2017.

 

Fundraising

  • News release of Liza Loop’s GeekFest Berlin 2016 presentation

Catalog

  • Improved quantity and quality of images displayed in image gallery tool

Operations

  • Salesforce implementation being customized by a large crew of volunteers

Exhibits

  • Lobby/Proof-of-Concept work continues

 

Please pass our news along, especially if you know someone else who will want to contribute money, know-how, artifacts, stories, or connections. Even by glancing at what we’ve done, you’re helping make HCLE happen as you pass along the story. Thank you.

 

  • Fundraising

Salesforce was used to send out two news releases to followers and potential funders about:

  • a series of videos excerpted from Liza Loop’s presentation at GeekFest Berlin 2016
  • a series of videos excerpted from the Leuphana/LO*OP Center Oral History Workshop held last year at Luneberg, Germany.

These were two of the main steps in our fundraising strategy:

  • Establish an awareness of our background and infrastructure
    • Release Make Vs Buy report – done
    • Release Leuphana/LO*OP oral history videos – done
    • Release Liza Loop’s GeekFest excerpts – done
  • Field responses – in progress
    • If responses don’t generate enough of a response
      • Consider Kickstarter campaign
      • Reinvigorate Vision Club

We also continue to review grant opportunities. The process will benefit from the boilerplate narratives we created for previous applications.

  • Collection

Phil Tymon assisted Liza Loop in the organizing and digitizing of the Collection.

  • Catalog

Anna Narbutovskih created a presentation tool (the Interim Collections Site) that allows images in the Catalog to be readily displayed as a gallery for quicker review and comparison. The intent is to make it easier to check for duplications, and to verify proper import from the official repository, temporary storage locations, and the Catalog. The Interim Site also helps demonstrate the vision of the Virtual Museum. (Link available upon request. It isn’t ready for general public visitors, yet.)

Anna also modified the Catalog Maintenance System to repurpose unused fields.

  • People/Volunteers

VolunteerMatch.org was used to find several candidate Salesforce volunteers. The response has been enthusiastic.

A volunteer offered to investigate license management issues.

  • Outreach

Videos from last year’s Oral History Workshop (LLOHW) were made available online.

Blog posts published:

Social Media Traffic Report

1/1/2014 12/30/2015 12/31/2016 6/30/2017
Facebook 59 104 171 176
Twitter 67 408 493 507
WordPress 18 49 50 52
Wikispaces 12 62 69 70

 

  • Wiki

The HCLE wiki continues to act as a communications center and as a digital loading dock.

Chuck Morrissey joined the wiki.

  • Exhibits

Anna Narbutovskih is creating a Proof of Concept site (aka Collections Viewer). A few select artifacts will be presented and displayed so visitors, followers, and prospective funders can better understand our goal, a virtual museum of the History of Computing in Learning and Education.

  • Operations

Thanks to a team of volunteers, our Salesforce account is being customized for our needs. One of their primary goals is the establishment of documented processes that will ease and standardize Salesforce processes that will be necessary because of volunteer turnover. The database is being adjusted to reflect the differences between Salesforce and our previous database, CiviCRM. We are training ourselves in its use, and using the news releases as training opportunities.

 

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HCLE Winter 2017 Progress Report

Welcome to the winter quarter of 2017 HCLE report. We share many of these news items via our outlets (wiki, blog, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) and collect them here for your and our convenience.

Our staff of 1.4 FTEs, volunteers and outside collaborators reached the following milestones in the winter (January through March) of 2017.

 

Fundraising

  • A news release was prepared for Liza Loop’s GeekFest Berlin 2016 presentation

Catalog

  • A presentation tool is being developed to aid image management

Collection

  • Staff was added to the task of organizing the Collection

Outreach

  • Liza Loop attended the Personal Digital Archiving 2017 conference

Operations

  • A Salesforce account was established and is being customized to HCLE’s needs

Exhibits

  • Lobby/Proof-of-Concept work continues

 

 

Please pass our news along, especially if you know someone else who will want to contribute money, know-how, artifacts, stories, or connections. Even by glancing at what we’ve done, you’re helping make HCLE happen as you pass along the story. Thank you.

  • Fundraising

A draft news release was prepared to inform followers and potential funders about a series of videos excerpted from Liza Loop’s presentation at GeekFest Berlin 2016. The organizers provided a high-resolution version of the video from which we extracted five excerpts that highlight different aspects of HCLE and its mission. (See the list in the Outreach section below.)

Thanks to some preliminary work by an outside contractor, HCLE now has a Salesforce account and database. We are training ourselves in its use, and using the news release as a training opportunity.

  • Collection

Phil Tymon is assisting Liza Loop in the organizing and digitizing of the Collection.

  • Catalog

Anna Narbutovskih is creating a presentation tool (the Interim Collections Site) that will allow images in the Catalog to be readily displayed as a gallery for quicker review and comparison. The intent is to make it easier to check for duplications, and to verify proper import from the official repository, temporary storage locations, and the Catalog.

Stan Crump is modifying the Catalog Maintenance System to repurpose one of the unused fields.

Phil Tymon is assisting Liza Loop in the cataloging of the Collection.

  • People/Volunteers

Our current team of volunteers and consultants continue to help with specific issues with the Catalog Maintenance System and miscellaneous system administration tasks.

We are pleased to introduce new volunteers and enthusiasts that have experience in the history of computing in learning and education: Chuck Morrissey, Marie Hicks.

VolunteerMatch.org was used to find several candidate Salesforce volunteers.

  • Outreach

GeekFest Berlin 2016 made Liza Loop’s video available online and also provided a copy so we may create more succinct excerpts. The editing has begun on five topics.

Liza Loop finished the quarter by attending the Personal Digital Archiving 2017 conference held by Stanford University Libraries from March 29-31, 2017.

Blog posts published:

Social Media Traffic Report

      • Twitter – Facebook ‘Following’ lists reconciled
1/1/2014 12/30/2015 12/31/2016 4/1/2017
Facebook 59 104 171 175
Twitter 67 408 493 490
WordPress 18 49 50 50
Wikispaces 12 62 69 70
  • Wiki

The HCLE wiki continues to act as a communications center and as a digital loading dock.

Chuck Morrissey joined the wiki.

  • Exhibits

Anna Narbutovskih is creating a Proof of Concept site (aka Collections Viewer). A few select artifacts will be presented and displayed so visitors, followers, and prospective funders can better understand our goal, a virtual museum of the History of Computing in Learning and Education.

Andy Molnar volunteered to highlight publications, promote existing interviews, conduct a Future Flashback interview, and work on exhibits of NSF’s impact and the military origins of technology in education.

  • Operations

The year was kicked off with a review of the program plan. As usual, the greatest variables that affect the timeline are funding and staffing.

A draft Design Document was produced to better communicate the goals, operations, restrictions, and experiences expected from the virtual museum. The primary audience is anyone involved in developing the software and web sites.

A trial contractor relationship ended with the positive consequence of establishing a Salesforce account for HCLE that is populated with our CiviCRM data. The account is being customized for our needs. The database is being adjusted to reflect the differences between Salesforce and our previous database, CiviCRM. We are training ourselves in its use, and using the news release as a training opportunity.

  • admin

HCLE’s complete collection of documents on GoogleDocs was ported to the HCLE Hostgator account as a backup.

Which comes first, the message or the audience?

Comments by Liza Loop, HCLE Founder & Executive Director

Earlier this year HCLE applied for a grant from California Humanities, a state-wide calhum_logoCouncil that gets its support from the US National Endowment for the Humanities. We didn’t get the grant. In the proposed project, entitled Hopes for a Future of Education: 5 California Ed Tech Pioneers Tell Their Stories, five pioneering California educators from the 1970s and 80s will tell us what inspired them to introduce computing into their classrooms, how it changed their teaching and how they hoped this would benefit their students. They will also share their thoughts about the status of ed tech today.

Since the deadline for another round of funding is approaching I asked CalHUM for feedback on our previous proposal. The program officer sent me the review sheet from one of the reviewers saying that the other reviewer basically agreed – their comments were more direct about the limited audience appeal demonstrated.

Why is it so hard to find participants for this conversation? I think it’s significant that there is no Museum of Learning and Education. This topic is buried so deeply in every society’s culture that, like the proverbial fish and water, it is difficult to perceive and taboo to question or change. During my 15 year association with Stanford’s Graduate School of Education I saw almost no initiatives to explore paradigm shifts in teaching or learning (although there probably were some in other departments). “Educational Reform”, a catch phrase from the period (1960-1990), meant tinkering around the edges of conventional, class-room based, teacher-centered educational practice. My hypothesis that schools and class rooms may not be the best technologies to support learning was summarily dismissed. And that was the response in a community of practice dedicated to education.

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Source

In the larger (developed) world remarkably few people enjoy or thrive in schools but even fewer are interested in working to invent something better. Instead we continue to export this institution throughout the lesser developed world and systematically plow under all vestiges of indigenous ways of cultural transmission. In 1985, I and my colleagues in educational computing saw the personal computer as the Trojan Horse that would allow us to break down the walls of the conventional classroom and conquer the status quo. I thought the audience for this message would grow.

And the audience has grown but it has split into two very different channels. The current HCLE  crowd is  an audience of rebels. Many of them are pioneers in different aspects of the electronics industry. They are the ones who were bored in school and were also able to access external sources of teaching so that they could learn to create new devices and functions. They have become the world’s intellectual and economic elite. They understand that there is something wrong with our educational system (and by “our” I mean those of India, Japan, Russia, Indonesia and others, not just the US). Unfortunately, few of them have turned their prodigious analytical skills to the problem of building better scaffolding to support learning in the broad “normal” population of the planet. Some don’t understand that, by definition, most people have an IQ of 105 or less and do not fall in the upper reaches of the bell-shaped curve as they do. IQ was designed to predict capacity to learn and excel in school-like settings. If we are to have an “educated” world population we cannot teach only the best and brightest. We have to support prodigious learning for everybody. Computing offers a promise of delivering prerecorded, interactive teaching materials to learners around the world — all learners, not just the very bright. Some HCLE supporters are so busy succeeding in their chosen fields they don’t realize how critical our educational failure is to sustaining their way of life.

The audience in the second and larger channel is engaged in a contemporary debate about the effectiveness of electronic devices in the classroom. For the most part they are unaware that their concerns and experiences have been under discussion for over forty years so they keep repeating the same old arguments. They are willing to consider “flipping” the classroom but not eliminating it as the principle way of organizing students.

It is important for our potential funders to understand that the current size and composition of the HCLE audience is the very reason they can benefit from supporting us. The people we can reach without additional funding are those who can catch the message without extensive curation and professional-level presentation techniques. But progressive social change is not a popularity contest. It’s a search for meaning and likely to be unpopular in it’s early stages. That’s why it needs partnerships with government agencies and philanthropic organizations. If it was popular Jane or John Q. Public would just buy it and we would not be asking for support.

HCLE First Quarter 2014 Progress Report

Welcome to the inaugural HCLE quarterly report. We share many of these news items via our outlets (wiki, blog, Facebook, Twitter @HCLEmuseum) but we decided to collect them, plus a few others, into a report so more people can learn about the project and maybe even help. Please pass it along, especially if you know someone else who will want to contribute money, time, artifacts, stories, or connections.

Last year’s news – 2013 available online

First Quarter 2014

Operations

  • Database/Catalog/Exhibits – tending towards Drupal/CiviCRM

    • note: NEH impressed with HCLE CiviCRM proposed implementation

  • Proof of Concept

    • proposal(s) received

    • work to commence upon acquisition of funds

  • Collecting examples of virtual museums and exhibits

    • benefit from other creative museums

  • Traveling Exhibit

    • coordinating with similar ventures

      • Computer Museum – UK (80’s classroom static exhibit)

      • Living Computer Museum (experience with small mobile exhibit)

Collaborations

  • Preliminary digitization begun

  • Preliminary research begun

    • Prof. Fred Turner using digitized PCC for class materials

  • Introductions/Networking

    • social media through Facebook and Twitter

    • introductory emails and calls (e.g. various History of Education museums)

 

Outreach

  • Homebrew Computing Club anniversary – Liza Loop attended

  • Writing Competition – $200 award to be announced by end of April

  • Social Media traffic report

 

3/13/2013

1/1/2014

3/29/2014

Facebook

0

59

71

Twitter

0

67

98

WordPress

0

18

29

Wikispaces

?

12

25

Fundraising

  • Individuals – Vision Club

    • dozens more invitations

  • Organizations – via Foundation Center

    • introductory letters

      • Sloan

      • Tech Museum of Innovation

      • 3M Heritage Trust Project

      • Accenture

  • Unsolicited Donations – enabled via PayPal

 

Second Quarter 2014

 

Continuation of above tasks plus:

Outreach

  • Museums and the Web

    • annual conference (Baltimore, MD April)

      • Lighting Talk “So Glad Our Museum Isn’t Real – It’s Virtual”

  • American Alliance of Museums

    • annual meeting (Seattle, WA May)

Fundraising

  • Additional Vision Club members

  • Additional organizations

    • particularly

      • Bell Family Foundation

      • Jeff Hawkins and Janet Strauss

      • Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation


 

 

“The teachers who deserve the exposure usually don’t have publicists. That’s one reason we’re here.”